Analysis of results…

As a result of the responses and feedback, we got from our online questionnaire, which we built using surveymonkey.com, where we asked members of our target audience questions about certain aspects of the concept and potential functionality of our app. One of our main concerns with the app was addressed in the first question which was; ‘Would you be willing to allow our app to use you’re personal; photos, text messages, contacts and location as part of an interactive drama?’ Our main worry was whether users would feel comfortable giving away their personal data in order to be apart of an interactive app based drama. The results were rather concerning as 57% of people said no. However, I personally believe that the question could be re-phrased in a way that may make the user feel more comfortable about giving their data away. Firstly, it is not clear in the question that they are going to get something back in the form of an amusing and entertaining video, which incorporates their photos, text messages, contacts and location into the narrative of an interactive story. Secondly, we would not be asking for all of the things in the question at once to avoid overwhelming and bombarding the user with pop-up permission requests. Finally, if a user downloads the app they should be aware of the concept and should have a general understanding of how the app works before downloading it, and should hopefully be aware they will be obliged to give away a small portion of they’re data in order to interact with, enjoy and be entertained by the app. For example, many people don’t think twice about accepting pop-up permission requests asking to access their microphone and photos, in exchange for a service or social media apps like Uber or Snapchat. Therefore, I believe that in reality people would be willing to give away their data once they’ve downloaded the app, for the simple reason that, they would not download the app without being made aware of the fact, it is an integral element to the app’s functionality that they give away some of there data, and if they don’t feel comfortable doing this they wouldn’t download the app in the first place.

ADDITIONS & CHANGES TO PITCH DOCUMENT:
The main change we made to our strategy in response to the testing results we received, to combat people concerns about giving away their data in exchange for an interactive app based drama. We decided to be super transparent and play on this idea about how ‘The Data Intrusion’ will use your data, so we turned the app requesting your permission to use your photos, into an animation and put it at the start of a campaign trailer for the app. We also produced minimal static advertising campaigns, simply featuring an IOS style permission box, and played on the idea of, do you dare to give your data away to The Data Intrusion? I believe that this level of transparency and openness combats users reservations about giving their data away for an interactive dramatic experience.

The other thing that testing informed us on when producing our pitch document was, on ‘How many times would you be willing to interact with the drama; if there were alternate storylines?’ the outcome was a 50/50 split between ‘3 times’ or ‘5 or more times’ we chose to go with the lower number of 3, and consequently produced a flow chart with 3 disperate storyline naratives interwoven with one another and from there produced a series of wireframes to visualise the flowchart story in the form of the interactive interface of an app.

Another change that we decided to do on the pitch document is that changed our client from Arts Council England to the app development company, Six to Start because we felt there was more of a connection between our app and this company. We decided to target the pitch document at Six to Start, mainly because the company could be the potential producer for our app, and they have a lot of experience in the field and are well renowned for producing high-quality apps and experiences, I believe they are a much more fitting client than Arts Council England funding.

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