Transgressing Boundaries Process…

BRIEF: (Re)view Boundaries “Life will not be contained within a boundary, but rather threads its way through the world along the myriad lines of its relations” Tim IngoldCreate a mobile experience that explores the political, personal, physical or psychic conditions of the site of a boundary in Bristol. Who defines the edges? What propels us to move across borders? How do people transgress the limits set-out?


RESEARCH | Sources of Inspiration:
Duncan Speakman – A Folded Path: 
A big source of inspiration for this project is Duncan Speakman and Circumstance, specifically the projects, ‘A Folded Path’ and ‘Of Sleeping Birds’ which are pedestrian speaker symphonies, soundtracks for cities, carried through the streets by a participating audience, experienced by everyone it passes. Comprising of 30, custom-built, location sensitive portable speakers each playing a different element of the music. The audience, divided into groups, takes a different route through the city. The speakers are highly directional so the movement of the people within the group changes the acoustic relationship between them, the audience becomes the orchestra. Learn more about the project and Circumstance here.

Janet Cardiff & George Bures Miller – The City of Forking Paths: Another source of inspiration is Janet Cardiff & George Bures Miller’s audio visual walks, specifically their 2014 piece titled ‘The City of Forking Paths’, which used an iPod Touch to visually and aurally navigate participants on a route in Sydney, Australia. As you walk, you follow the audio and video on the screen, which was previously recorded from the same location. The voice of Cardiff leads you, and they have staged scenarios in the video such as; incidents, performances and musical experiences for you to discover along the way as you reflect upon the history worn into the streets. Also, see below the video of a similar piece, ‘Alter Bahnhof Video Walk’ below. Check out their other work here.

Rik Lander – Haply Headphone Experiences: Haply headphone experiences are app based audio dramas produced by Rik Lander. The soundtrack guides participants through a stimulating mini-drama. What everyone hears is synchronised, but may be slightly different, which results in funny, thought-provoking moments for entertainment or team-building. They are aimed at conferences to help break the ice and helps delegates become more empathetic and open to new ideas. Check out their website here.

Iain Borden – Skateboarding, Space and The City:

IDEA PROPOSAL:

Below: You can see a series of images showing us interviewing both skateboarders and members of the general public at the Bearpit in Bristol city centre, a popular space for both skateboarders and members of the public, as there are a number of obstacles to skate and it is an underpass for people to walk under the busy roundabout to quickly get across town. We interviewed approximately five skateboarders and five members of the general public and asked them a series of questions, which we decided on before we went out (see above). We wanted to attempt to gauge an understanding of the kind of responses we might get when it comes to recording the final documentary, whilst also giving you an idea of what the audio documentary will comprise of and what we are trying to make. To do this we have cut together a short pilot with some of the best responses we got from both the skateboarders and members of the public at three of the main skate spots in Bristol; The Bearpit, The Memorial and Lloyds. You can listen to this short pilot below.

PRESENTATION FEEDBACK:
WIREFRAMES: Below shows a series of wireframes we produced to give an idea of what the user journey of the app would look like, from the start of the locative audio documentary experience to the finish. More importantly, we thought a lot about how we were going to direct the user of our app experience to the specific area of Bristol which they would need to be in in order for our documentary to be as immersive as possible. There were three skate spots in the centre of Bristol which we wanted to target; The Bearpit, The Memorial and Lloyds, and coincidently and rather fortunately for us, these three spots are one linear walk from one side of Bristol to the other. We initially had three ideas about how the user would experience the app and how the interface would accommodate this. Firstly, we considered having a map page with all three spots for the user to select, then visit that spot with the aid of Google maps directions. Then play that chapter of the audio documentary exploring that skate spot, listening to the views and opinions of the skateboarders and members of the public that interact with that space, that we will collect. However, the problem with this idea is, we wanted the app despite being broken into three sections, one for each skate spot, to have a clear structural narrative, a beginning middle and end. This would be difficult to achieve if the user was able to select any spot at random, we could have made a narrative arc for each skate spot, but I don’t believe that it would have felt as complete without referring to the other spots. Our second idea about a potential user experience was, to make one long audio piece with a clear narrative structure and conclusion, instruct the user to start at the Bearpit and use the map to navigate to the next spot when we instructed them to do so, but this seemed like a logistical nightmare because of the getting timing right and everyone taking part having different walking paces. Finally we settled on an idea based on our initial thought, we will show the user a map with only the first spot we want them to go to, they would then be encouraged would tap that skate spot, play that chapter of the audio documentary, then return to the map page where the second spot would appear to select and then once they have listened to that, the final spot would appear on the map, concluding the documentary. This way, they could only go to the spots in the linear order in which we intended, and they could play the audio once they were ready and arrived there, they wouldn’t be rushed buy our sense of timing like they would in our second idea.

We initially had three ideas about how the user would experience the app and how the interface would accommodate this. Firstly, we considered having a map page with all three spots for the user to select, then visit that spot with the aid of Google maps directions. Then play that chapter of the audio documentary exploring that skate spot, listening to the views and opinions of the skateboarders and members of the public that interact with that space, that we will collect. However, the problem with this idea is, we wanted the app despite being broken into three sections, one for each skate spot, to have a clear structural narrative, a beginning middle and end. This would be difficult to achieve if the user was able to select any spot at random, we could have made a narrative arc for each skate spot, but I don’t believe that it would have felt as complete without referring to the other spots. Our second idea about a potential user experience was, to make one long audio piece with a clear narrative structure and conclusion, instruct the user to start at the Bearpit and use the map to navigate to the next spot when we instructed them to do so, but this seemed like a logistical nightmare because of the getting timing right and everyone taking part having different walking paces. Finally we settled on an idea based on our initial thought, we will show the user a map with only the first spot we want them to go to, they would then be encouraged would tap that skate spot, play that chapter of the audio documentary, then return to the map page where the second spot would appear to select and then once they have listened to that, the final spot would appear on the map, concluding the documentary. This way, they could only go to the spots in the linear order in which we intended, and they could play the audio once they were ready and arrived there, they wouldn’t be rushed buy our sense of timing like they would in our second idea.

Our second idea about a potential user experience was, to make one long audio piece with a clear narrative structure and conclusion, instruct the user to start at the Bearpit and use the map to navigate to the next spot when we instructed them to do so, but this seemed like a logistical nightmare because of the getting timing right and everyone taking part having different walking paces. Finally we settled on an idea based on our initial thought, we will show the user a map with only the first spot we want them to go to, they would then be encouraged would tap that skate spot, play that chapter of the audio documentary, then return to the map page where the second spot would appear to select and then once they have listened to that, the final spot would appear on the map, concluding the documentary. This way, they could only go to the spots in the linear order in which we intended, and they could play the audio once they were ready and arrived there, they wouldn’t be rushed buy our sense of timing like they would in our second idea.

Finally we settled on an idea based on our initial thought, we will show the user a map with only the first spot we want them to go to, they would then be encouraged to tap that skate spot on the map, play that chapter of the audio documentary, then return to the map page where the second spot would appear to select and then once they have listened to that, the final spot would appear on the map, concluding the documentary. This way, they could only go to the spots in the linear order in which we intended, and they could play the audio once they were ready and arrived there, they wouldn’t be rushed buy our sense of timing like they would in our second idea and we could also produce a traditional narrative documentary structure setting out our intentions in the first chapter, showing both sides of the arguments throughout the first, second and third chapters and concluding in the final chapter. By employing this method of hiding and systematically revealing each skate spot and consequently each chapter of the audio documentary we are simultaneously guiding the user around the city it in the most efficient and linear way, whilst also guiding them through the audio narrative of the documentary.

LOGO:

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